Quilt for Mom

As I mentioned in a previous post, my bright idea for Christmas gifts was to make coordinating quilts for my mom and dad. Dad’s was shipped and arrived at the beginning of March. Since then, it’s been keeping him—and the occasional visitor—toasty warm.

In April, I finished Mom’s quilt and delivered it to her in person. It’s the same pattern and has the same background as Dad’s quilt, but I made it with the Kaffe Fassett fabrics my mom loves.

I actually started Mom’s quilt first, so I have some of process shots to share. The block pattern I used is Falling Triangles. The tutorial in the link starts with two 10-inch squares of fabric for the quarter square triangles, but I made mine with 8-inch squares, which resulted in 6-inch finished blocks once the additional background strips were sewn on.

I made 84 blocks for the quilt center, 7 across and 12 down. With most of the fabrics, I cut just one 8-inch square, resulting in 4 blocks of that fabric. For other fabrics, I cut two squares. I didn’t end up using all the blocks I made, however.

Many of the fabrics were pulled from my stash; I bought the two polka-dot fabrics, the stripe, and a couple others to round out the selection.

Once I had the layout set, I had a hard time keeping my triangles oriented correctly as I sewed. So I marked every other one with a V for vertical, which made sense at the time.

With the center sewn, I added a border of squares and rectangles using all the center fabrics. The math didn’t turn out right to have all 4-inch (finished) squares, so I threw in a few 2 x 4-inch (finished) rectangles to make it work.

Next I added a border of the background to bring things down a notch. And then I amped it back up with the border fabric. It turned out so bright and fun!

Rather than try to quilt this giant quilt (it ended up being about 70 x 100 inches) myself, I asked Holly Seever to longarm it for me. She and I talked a bit about what I had in mind, and then Holly came back with a plan.

She quilted swirls with tails all over the center, Xs and figure 8s on the squares and rectangles, smaller swirls in the background border, and finally, feathers with swirls on the border.

The quilting looks great on the back, too. For that I used a Kaffe Fassett wide fabric and some leftover fabrics from the front. (A note of warning about wide/backing fabrics: Since the fabric is around 108 inches wide [instead of the usual 42 inches], the fabric has to be folded more times to fit on a similar size bolt. That folding makes it harder to cut a straight cut of fabric. Tearing the fabric [with the grain] would result in straight edges, but cutting can get really skewed. In fact, Holly said this backing was skewed about 10 inches, so she had to be careful of how she loaded it on her longarm.)

I bound the quilt with the border fabric. And, of course, added a quick label, too.

Even though Mom is a quilter herself, she appreciated having a quilt made just for her. And I enjoyed making it for her. I had never made a quilt with fabrics from just one designer, so it was fun to see how well they went together even though they were designed years apart. Even the backing fabric has many of the exact colors as the binding fabric.



Finished Quilt of Valor

qov-quilt-smallThe quilt I made for the Quilts of Valor program is finished! As you may recall, back in March, I pledged that 2016 was the year I was going to make a quilt for this program. Seven months later, it has come to pass—not too shabby!

When last I posted about this quilt, the top was complete. Since then, I made a back for the quilt with a blue and white stripe fabric and a red and white polka dot. I knew I wanted the quilting to be more intricate than I usually do for my quilts, so I asked Holly Seever from the Cincinnati Modern Quilt Guild if she’d be willing to take on the job.

Holly has long been wowing the guild with the quilting she does on her domestic machine, but she recently purchased a longarm machine and began taking on projects for other quilters. I wanted to keep the star theme going in the quilting and suggested maybe adding some red thread, too. Other than that, I left the quilting design up to Holly.

I couldn’t have been more pleased with what she did.


Each of the star blocks had this same quilting pattern. I love the swirls and pebbles in the corners. And it looks even more amazing on the blocks with the blue backgrounds.


The blue fabric looks completely different with the quilting, which I think is pretty cool.


And she quilted the same star design in the plain white squares using that red thread we talked about. I think that adds just the right amount of color.


And the quilting looks super cool on the back of the quilt, too.

With the quilt expertly quilted, I added the binding—a red solid to go with that red thread.


Next, the quilt needed a label. The Quilts of Valor program requires that each quilt have a label that includes all of the following: the name of the person who made the quilt, the name of the person who quilted it, the name of the program, and space to write in the name of the recipient and the date it was received. The great thing is, QoV provided a link to Modern Yardage, where they sell labels for just this purpose. There were several to choose from, and even with shipping, the cost was less than $2. I really appreciated this convenience.


I’m not thrilled that the backing fabric shows through the label, but I tried to line up the label information spaces with the stripes of the fabric so it looks kind of intentional.

Finally, each Quilt of Valor needs a presentation case. Many of these are simply pillowcases made in coordinating fabric, which was easy enough to do. I used a star fabric that didn’t make it into the quilt for the body of the case and used leftover fabric from the quilt for the trim and cuff. I followed the burrito (or sausage) method for making the pillowcase using a tutorial from The Seasoned Homemaker.


The tutorial was very easy to follow. And it even included fancy French seams (no raw edges) on the interior!


With the quilt finished and labeled and with the presentation case made, I requested a destination for my quilt from Quilts for Valor. Within a day, I received a note asking me to send the quilt to the Warrior Transition program at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Here, soldiers who are med boarded out (meaning they don’t return to their previous duties due to medical issues) are shown several quilts, and they can choose one to take home with them. The director of the program said, “I never see a Soldier leave my office with one that doesn’t have a tear in their eye.”


So I shipped the quilt there on Monday. I know it will find a good home soon.