Quilt for Mom

As I mentioned in a previous post, my bright idea for Christmas gifts was to make coordinating quilts for my mom and dad. Dad’s was shipped and arrived at the beginning of March. Since then, it’s been keeping him—and the occasional visitor—toasty warm.

In April, I finished Mom’s quilt and delivered it to her in person. It’s the same pattern and has the same background as Dad’s quilt, but I made it with the Kaffe Fassett fabrics my mom loves.

I actually started Mom’s quilt first, so I have some of process shots to share. The block pattern I used is Falling Triangles. The tutorial in the link starts with two 10-inch squares of fabric for the quarter square triangles, but I made mine with 8-inch squares, which resulted in 6-inch finished blocks once the additional background strips were sewn on.

I made 84 blocks for the quilt center, 7 across and 12 down. With most of the fabrics, I cut just one 8-inch square, resulting in 4 blocks of that fabric. For other fabrics, I cut two squares. I didn’t end up using all the blocks I made, however.

Many of the fabrics were pulled from my stash; I bought the two polka-dot fabrics, the stripe, and a couple others to round out the selection.

Once I had the layout set, I had a hard time keeping my triangles oriented correctly as I sewed. So I marked every other one with a V for vertical, which made sense at the time.

With the center sewn, I added a border of squares and rectangles using all the center fabrics. The math didn’t turn out right to have all 4-inch (finished) squares, so I threw in a few 2 x 4-inch (finished) rectangles to make it work.

Next I added a border of the background to bring things down a notch. And then I amped it back up with the border fabric. It turned out so bright and fun!

Rather than try to quilt this giant quilt (it ended up being about 70 x 100 inches) myself, I asked Holly Seever to longarm it for me. She and I talked a bit about what I had in mind, and then Holly came back with a plan.

She quilted swirls with tails all over the center, Xs and figure 8s on the squares and rectangles, smaller swirls in the background border, and finally, feathers with swirls on the border.

The quilting looks great on the back, too. For that I used a Kaffe Fassett wide fabric and some leftover fabrics from the front. (A note of warning about wide/backing fabrics: Since the fabric is around 108 inches wide [instead of the usual 42 inches], the fabric has to be folded more times to fit on a similar size bolt. That folding makes it harder to cut a straight cut of fabric. Tearing the fabric [with the grain] would result in straight edges, but cutting can get really skewed. In fact, Holly said this backing was skewed about 10 inches, so she had to be careful of how she loaded it on her longarm.)

I bound the quilt with the border fabric. And, of course, added a quick label, too.

Even though Mom is a quilter herself, she appreciated having a quilt made just for her. And I enjoyed making it for her. I had never made a quilt with fabrics from just one designer, so it was fun to see how well they went together even though they were designed years apart. Even the backing fabric has many of the exact colors as the binding fabric.



Quilt for Dad

dadquilt2Back in November, I decided to make quilts for both my mom and my dad for Christmas. In November. For Christmas. Yeah, that was a bit ambitious. I decided to use the same block—falling triangles— for each and the same background fabric, a batik from Me+You. But for Mom’s quilt I used Kaffe Fassett fabrics in bright reds, pink, and purples. And for Dad’s quilt I used blues.

Dad and I have a long history of blue. His eyes are clear blue, and I can’t help but give him blue shirts for gifts to set off his eyes. I can’t even tell you how many blue shirts I’ve given that man over the years. A lot. Plaid shirts, denim shirts, a very occasional striped shirt if it’s not too flashy. A lot of blue shirts. So when it came time to choose a color for his quilt, of course it would be blue. And because I’m a bit of a blue girl myself, every fabric came from my stash.


Come Christmas morning, Mom opened up a bright, colorful quilt top (more to come on that one in a later post). And Dad opened a partial top made with blue fabrics. The look in those blue eyes when he opened that partial quilt was pretty priceless. You see, despite my mom being a quilter, he had only one quilt that was his own, and it was on its last legs. He really needed a new quilt.

So, while my plan had been to finish Mom’s quilt first, Dad’s got moved to the front of the line. He didn’t want the quilt as large as I had intended to make it (he just wanted a nap quilt rather than a bed quilt), so that was easy. And he didn’t want cotton batting, which isn’t quite warm enough for a Wisconsin winter nap. After a bit of discussion, Mom and I decided I should try wool batting.

I brought the two quilts home from Christmas and started working again on Dad’s. The center of the quilt was done, so I just added the scrappy border. For the back I used a few pieces larger pieces of fabric from the front.


I pin baste my quilts, and basting the wool batting was a breeze. That batting stuck to the fabric like nothing I’d ever seen, so there was no shifting of the layers while I basted.

And quilting it was a lot easier than I thought, too. Wool is very lightweight, so it was easier to move around my domestic sewing machine than cotton quilts of that size. Wool batting is lofty, and so the quilt is puffier than a cotton quilt, too.

dadquilt4I kept the quilting very minimal, just echo quilting the triangles and a square design in the border. It was the fastest way to quilt it, in my mind, and honestly, I knew Dad wouldn’t care too much about the quilting.

dadquilt8And I added a label, of course.


A few technical notes about the quilt: I used 8″ squares for the falling triangle blocks instead of the 10″ squares in the tutorial. This resulted in the 6.5″ blocks that I used in the quilt. The quilt finished at 61″ wide and 77.5″ high.

dadquilt3When I washed the quilt, the fabric (which I hadn’t prewashed) shrunk up and made the quilt extra crinkly and puffy.

dadquilt_washedThe quilt should arrive today—a bit late for Christmas and a bit late for his birthday, but hopefully in time for some more winter naps.