Giving the Sawtooth Stars Quilt

Aummy with quilt

Not only is my Sawtooth Stars quilt finally finished, it’s now in the hands of the person I made it for: my aunt, Mary Ann Doyle.

Aunt Aummy, as we call her, has been a special aunt to me and to many of my sisters and cousins on my dad’s side of the family. She remembers all of our birthdays, made Christmases at the farm extra special, and takes care to know each of her nieces and nephews—and great-nieces and great-nephews—as the individuals we are.

So I wanted to make a quilt just for her. Blue is her favorite color, so I used that as the background. Then I made 18 large stars, one to represent each of her nieces and nephews. Each star is made from a different fabric.

Sawtooth finished detail

Around the large stars, I placed 27 small stars, one to represent each of her great-nieces and great-nephews. Again, all the fabrics are different, for a total of 45 star fabrics.

Sawtooth finished 4

I didn’t have enough boy-looking fabric to assign one star to each person, but I did make the two yellow stars at the top with my two cousins who have passed away in mind. You can read more about the making of the quilt top in this previous post.

I did the quilting myself on my home machine. I sewed straight lines from the corners of the stars and did close wavy lines in the blue background. I struggled with the quilting, as I mentioned in this previous post, but it certainly serves its purpose. The photo at the top shows the quilt after it was washed, and the close quilting made it extra crinkly and cozy looking.

Sawtooth back

I pieced the back with two Amy Butler prints plus a few extra pieces to fill out the size, which ended up being about 67″ x 72″.

And I added a label to the back, of course.

Sawtooth label

The binding is a little different for me. I didn’t have enough of the blue on the front of the quilt for the whole binding, so I made a two-piece binding.

Sawtooth double_sided binding

I followed the tutorial in the book String Quilt Revival. It calls for two strips the length needed for the binding: one strip is  1″ wide and the other is 1.5″ wide. After some preparation, these are sewn together (which had to be the most boring thing I’ve ever sewn). It’s then sewn onto the front of the quilt and folded over to the back for hand stitching. I really like that the seam of the two strips sits right on the edge of the quilt, giving it a very nice finish.

This one has been in the works for about a year, so it’s kind of exciting to have it completely done and at its new home. Now, on to whatever is next!

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10 Comments

  1. Love this, Christine – especially the symbolism of the 18 stars, what a great way to include everyone — and I am sure that makes this quilt extra meaningful for your Auntie! GREAT JOB!

    Reply
    • Thank you, Meryl Ann! I really enjoyed thinking about the symbolism and look forward to adding it to further projects, even if the symbolism is just for me.

      Reply
  2. lela mckee friel

     /  October 28, 2015

    I really Love this quilt Christine! Me too! I love the symbolism of the 18 stars and your choice of fabrics from the prints to the colors! Beautiful work!

    Reply
  3. lela mckee friel

     /  October 28, 2015

    Hi Christine, I am a big fan of your quilts! I forgot to mention the back of your quilt on this one is just stunning! I love that tree fabric and how you combine it with the dark blue print. Forgive me if I have asked you this before, but I wanted to ask what your fabric sources are? I am a quilter who lives in a rural area, so I am always searching for new outlets for fabrics. Thank You so much!

    Reply
  4. WOW what a wonderful, meaningful present, for both of you. Thanks for sharing. I am sure she will treasure it.

    Reply
  5. lela mckee friel

     /  November 11, 2015

    Thank You for the link to fabric shack Christine! I am just seeing this post for the first time, so sorry for the lag in reply. Happy quilting!

    Reply
  1. Christmas Tree Wall Hanging | Christine Doyle

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